Category: Ancient Greek

Why is the ancient Greek tonal pronunciation theory so refuted by Modern Greek speakers?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-27 | Comments: 1 Comment
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

The right answer to this is Dimitris Almyrantis’, which goes into the motivations and anxieties behind this attitude. I had passed on answering this, but I’ve just been asked this externally, by a user who pointed out the discrepancy with Chinese and Italian. There are a few linguistic and cultural factors that have made this […]

Can “αἰὲν ἀνάβηθι” be improved to resemble the Latin “excelsior?”

By: | Post date: 2017-07-25 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

Not that I actually know much about Homeric Greek, but the infinitive does work better than the imperative, because it makes it less personal and more gnomic: it is a statement to the world, not a command to the individual. Although in context, it is not a command anyway, but reported speech: Ever to Excel […]

What is the etymology of the ancient Greek word “Otis”?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-23 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

Frisk’s etymological dictionary concurs with Frank Dauenhauer’s answer, that the bustard was called ōtis ‘one with ears’ (“from its cheek tufts or head? See Thompson, Birds”); thus also ōtos ‘scops owl’, from its ear tufts. If you go to A glossary of Greek birds : Thompson, D’Arcy Wentworth, 1860-1948 Sir, p. 200, you’ll find he […]

Are patron saints the same idea as Greek gods under another pretext?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-21 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Culture, Mediaeval Greek, Modern Greek

Thanks to the other respondents. Patron saints share with the Ancient Greek gods the notion of domain of influence. They also, significantly, share the notion of patronage: elements of folk religion such as Votive offerings (Greek tamata), and theological notions such as Intercession of saints, are tied up with that understanding of how the Heavens […]

Why is aponeurosis named as such? I know the “apo” part. What’s the word root: “neurosis”?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-21 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

To expand on Raul Hernandez’s answer: aponeurōsis = apo ‘away, from, of’ + neurōsis neurōsis = neuroō ‘to equip with sinews, to put strings on (a bow, a lyre)’ + –sis ‘nominalisation suffix, -ing’ neuroō = neuron ‘nerve, sinew’ + –oō ‘verb suffix, often factive: to make something be or have X’. So aponeurosis literally […]

What are the most important new discoveries that have been made about the ancient world in the 21st Century?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-19 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Literature

In Greek philology, the biggest finds this century have been: The previously unreadable texts in the Archimedes Palimpsest, that have become readable through a synchrotron, including a couple of new texts by Archimedes, a new speech by Hyperides, and a new commentary on Aristotle by Alexander of Aphrodisias. Transcribed and released in 2008, though only […]

Which books on Greek and Roman mythology list the most number of mythological characters?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-15 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Literature

As I am nowadays saying openly, I worked at the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae for 17 years, 13 which I spent working on word recognition. As a result, I got to know pretty well where all the obscure names were in Greek literature. In the classical Canon, hands down, the Bibliotheca (Pseudo-Apollodorus). Among online resources, THEOI […]

Are there any books that are written in Ancient Greek?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-12 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

If the question means, are there any contemporary books in Ancient Greek: not a lot, but a few: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Ancient Greek Edition): J.K. Rowling: 9781582348261: Amazon.com: Books Bruno Coitinho’s answer to What modern books have been translated to ancient languages?: Don Camillo, Sherlock Holmes Eleftherios V. Tserkezis’ answer to What […]

How do I fathom the 3rd declension?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-10 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Greek_grammar_(tables)#Third_declension And I weigh in too, though my answer is not really different to Desmond’s. The way to fathom the 3rd declension is via proto-Greek. That’s what the grammars do, whether it’s the most useful thing to do or not. Focus on the recurring endings: -(ς) -ος -ι -α -Ø, -ες -ων -σι -ας -ες […]

Why are the 1st, 2nd and 3rd declensions called this way?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-10 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

The Ancient Greek (Roman-era) grammarians, Dionysius Thrax and Aelius Herodianus, were giants that we are in debt of for a lot of our understanding of grammar, and traditional grammar comes from them. But they did not quite get declensions. They certainly did not get the number of declensions in Greek down to something manageable. We […]

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