Category: Ancient Greek

What are the most important new discoveries that have been made about the ancient world in the 21st Century?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-19 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Literature

In Greek philology, the biggest finds this century have been: The previously unreadable texts in the Archimedes Palimpsest, that have become readable through a synchrotron, including a couple of new texts by Archimedes, a new speech by Hyperides, and a new commentary on Aristotle by Alexander of Aphrodisias. Transcribed and released in 2008, though only […]

Which books on Greek and Roman mythology list the most number of mythological characters?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-15 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Literature

As I am nowadays saying openly, I worked at the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae for 17 years, 13 which I spent working on word recognition. As a result, I got to know pretty well where all the obscure names were in Greek literature. In the classical Canon, hands down, the Bibliotheca (Pseudo-Apollodorus). Among online resources, THEOI […]

Are there any books that are written in Ancient Greek?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-12 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

If the question means, are there any contemporary books in Ancient Greek: not a lot, but a few: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Ancient Greek Edition): J.K. Rowling: 9781582348261: Amazon.com: Books Bruno Coitinho’s answer to What modern books have been translated to ancient languages?: Don Camillo, Sherlock Holmes Eleftherios V. Tserkezis’ answer to What […]

How do I fathom the 3rd declension?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-10 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Greek_grammar_(tables)#Third_declension And I weigh in too, though my answer is not really different to Desmond’s. The way to fathom the 3rd declension is via proto-Greek. That’s what the grammars do, whether it’s the most useful thing to do or not. Focus on the recurring endings: -(ς) -ος -ι -α -Ø, -ες -ων -σι -ας -ες […]

Why are the 1st, 2nd and 3rd declensions called this way?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-10 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

The Ancient Greek (Roman-era) grammarians, Dionysius Thrax and Aelius Herodianus, were giants that we are in debt of for a lot of our understanding of grammar, and traditional grammar comes from them. But they did not quite get declensions. They certainly did not get the number of declensions in Greek down to something manageable. We […]

What is the difference between η and ᾱ in classical Greek (first declension FEM nouns)?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-05 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

Dialectal. To clarify, the question is about the nominative singular ending of first declension feminine nouns. Some of those nouns end in a short -ă, and they’re accented accordingly on the antepenult: thálassa “sea”. The remainder end in either a long -ā or a long -ē. The difference in Classical Greek is a matter of […]

Where does the Greek quote “βίᾳ ἤρχεσαν οἱ τριάκοντα τῶν Ἀθηναίων και τὸν δῆμον ἤδη κατελελύκεσαν” come from?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-04 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

The quote as given does not appear in the Ancient canon, or even the Mediaeval canon. Nor in fact does the phrase βίᾳ ἤρχεσαν “they had ruled with force”. The phrase is a little odd; it’s very much a tendentious summary of what happened in Athens with the Thirty Tyrants, which would be out of […]

Why was Heracles named after Hera, when his real mother was Alcmene?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-04 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Culture

The in-universe explanation (to treat Greek mythology like fantasy fiction, and that’s not that absurd really) is He was renamed Heracles [“glory of Hera”] in an unsuccessful attempt to mollify Hera. (Heracles – Wikipedia) Stepping behind the curtain, in his monograph on Greek religion (p. 322), Walter Burkert says the name might be a coincidence; […]

Why were the Ionian Greeks called the Ionians Greeks when the Sea of Ionia is on the other side of Greece?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-03 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

To elaborate on Niko Vasileas’ answer and Michael Anderson’s answer: Nominative Iōn, Genitive Iōn-os, Adjective Iōn-ikos or Iōn-ios refers to the tribe of Ionians. Adjective Iŏn-ios refers to the sea, and is traditionally derived from the lover of Zeus, Io (mythology): Nominative Iō, Genitive Ious < *Iŏ-os. Io, transformed into a cow, is supposed to […]

What was Socrates’ original word for marrying?

By: | Post date: 2017-06-19 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

Did Socrates really say “if you get a bad wife, you’ll become a philosopher” in any original texts like Plato’s or Xenophon’s dialogue? Two sources named: John Uebersax’s answer to Did Socrates really say “if you get a bad wife, you’ll become a philosopher” in any original texts like Plato’s or Xenophon’s dialogue? Diogenes Laertius, […]

  • Subscribe to Blog via Email

    Join 300 other subscribers

  • July 2018
    M T W T F S S
    « Jan    
     1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    16171819202122
    23242526272829
    3031