Category: Latin

In the Matrix, why is the Oracle’s message “Know Thyself” in Latin, instead of the original Greek?

By: | Post date: 2016-11-03 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Culture, Latin

Because Latin was always better known in the West than Greek. Greek proverbial expressions are almost uniformly quoted in the West in Latin; e.g. Deus ex machina, not apo mēchanēs theos; Et tu Brute, not kai sy teknon; quod erat demonstrandum, not hoper edei deixai. Gnothi seauton seems to be as prevalent as nosce te […]

What’s the Latin translation of “Fun or money? (I’ll work for one or the other; optimally, both)”?

By: | Post date: 2016-09-26 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

Pro ludo aut pro lucro? Pro alterutro laboro; pro utroque malim. Alberto Yagos? Answered 2016-09-26 [Originally posted on http://quora.com/Whats-the-Latin-translation-of-Fun-or-money-Ill-work-for-one-or-the-other-optimally-both-”/answer/Nick-Nicholas-5]

What is the Latin translation of “healing is not linear”?

By: | Post date: 2016-09-14 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

I’ll take a different template, with Alberto Yagos’ as an inspiration. When Ptolemy I asked if there were any shortcuts for plodding through the Elements, Euclid supposedly said, “there is no royal road to geometry”: Euclid – Wikiquote The first Latin translation of the quote is Non est regia ad Geometriam via. Non est regia […]

Latin: if there is no slang terminology utilized in it, how boring a language is Latin?

By: | Post date: 2016-09-11 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

Quite apart from the sexual vocabulary noted by other respondents, Vulgar Latin, as we can reconstruct it from the Romance languages, had words we can only classify as slang. Such as testa “head”, which originally meant “pot”. Or caballus “nag” instead of equus “horse”. Or using manducare “to chew” instead of edere for “to eat”. […]

How do I join Latin and Greek base words to form a new word for a lover of jewelry?

By: | Post date: 2016-09-07 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, English, Latin, Linguistics

As others have said: mixing Latin and Greek is no longer a problem; mixing English and Greek is not that much of a problem, as you can see in Category:English words suffixed with -phile I admit: I find brandophile, a lover of brands, and foodophile, horrible (foodophile? really?). And computerphile is way too close to […]

How would I go about making a Latin translator website?

By: | Post date: 2016-08-31 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

Anon, I commend you on your initiative. I don’t commend you on your question topic tagging; hopefully you’ll get some responses better targeted than this now. Learn Python. Not because I have any love for Python. I’d be happy to chain Larry Wall and Guido van Rossum together: each other’s company would be punishment enough. […]

Why isn’t there a single Modern Latin language like Modern Greek?

By: | Post date: 2016-08-25 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

How many months ago did you A2A me this, Zeibura S. Kathau? I’ve been clearing out my backlog. The question really is not why isn’t there a Single Modern Latin, but why is there a Single Modern Greek. Actually, there is not a single Modern Hellenic language. Under no linguistically informed notion of language is […]

Why do Latin second declension neuter nouns look like singular feminine nouns in plural nominative and accusative?

By: | Post date: 2016-07-09 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

I went to Sihler: New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin Indo-European fem sg: –e[math]H_2[/math]. Indo-European neuter o-stem plural: –e-[math]H_2[/math]. They are the same; as Sihler notes (p. 263) “identical in form with the nom.sg of -e[math]H_2[/math] stems (=first declension) and probably the point of departure for the creation of that stem.”— (p. 266) “a […]

Are Greek and Latin roots the only atomic words we know so far from which we can build all the compounded words?

By: | Post date: 2016-06-19 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, English, Latin, Linguistics

I think what you mean, OP, is: are Graeco-Latin stems the only stems from which compound words can be formed in English. The answer is of course no: there are plenty of compounds in English based on indigenous Germanic words, and there were all the way back to Old English. Statecraft. Breastfeed. Windmill. There was […]

Was Latin spoken in the Byzantine empire, even though the official language was Greek? And did Byzantines study Latin texts?

By: | Post date: 2016-01-18 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

What Steve Theodore’s answer to Was Latin spoken in the Byzantine empire, even though the official language was Greek? And did Byzantines study Latin texts? said, and what Steve Theodore’s answer to Were the medieval Byzantines familiar with the famous figures of Roman antiquity, like Cato the Elder, Scipio Africanus, or Cincinnatus?  said. In particular, […]

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