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Day: January 12, 2017

What is it called when you get aroused by watching people die?

By: | Post date: 2017-01-12 | Comments: 2 Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, English, Linguistics

Vote #1 Vicky Prest: Vicky Prest’s answer to What is it called when you get aroused by watching people die? No, seriously. Because this answer is just pedantic commentary on her answer, from someone who knows too much Greek, and can look up words on Wikipedia: List of paraphilias – Wikipedia. Symphorophilia. Literally, “misfortune-love”. Not […]

What are some common words between Italian and Greek?

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Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek

There’s a substantial number of Italian loanwords in Modern Greek. Many of those loanwords are specifically from Venetian, rather than Tuscan Italian, because a large part of Greece was under Venetian rule for centuries. (And a large number of Greek islands were ruled by other Northern Italian republics.) Italian was also the language through which […]

Is it possible for a dialect to be agglutinative but for the “base” language not to be?

By: | Post date: 2017-01-12 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: General Language, Linguistics

Yes, my fellow respondents have rightly raised the definitional issues that would give one pause about agglutinativity. I’m going to be less scrupulous. The difference between fusional, isolating and agglutinative languages is a significant typological difference—although of course, as with anything typological, there are shades of grey that it ignores, and square pegs that it […]

How are Rumi’s poems in Greek?

By: | Post date: 2017-01-12 | Comments: 2 Comments
Posted in categories: Literature, Mediaeval Greek

http://www.opoudjis.net/Play/rumiwalad.html I swear, folks, I am not bribing Khateeb to ask me these questions! So yes. Both Rumi, and his son Sultan Walad, wrote some verses in Greek and in Turkish. That he wrote in Greek is no surprise, given that Rumi means “of Rum = The (former) Roman Empire”, where Rumi settled (Konya). I […]