Tag: Early Modern Greek

Kaplanis on Polytonic in Early Modern Greek editions

By: | Post date: 2009-05-19 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Mediaeval Greek, Writing Systems
Tags: , ,

So. I’m going to summarise the Mona Lisa with a doodle, and Tasos Kaplanis’ paper on Polytonic in Early Modern Greek editions with a dot point summary. It’s my summary, not his, and I invite comment on whether it’s a fair summary (including from him). In all, I sort of agree intellectually with his conclusion; […]

Rumi & Walad: Cantabrigensian Contribution

By: | Post date: 2009-05-11 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Mediaeval Greek
Tags: , , , ,

I forwarded my posts on Rumi and Sultan Walad to Petros Karatsareas, who is in fact doing his doctoral work on Cappadocian morphology in Cambridge, and who had written me to ask what I thought of those texts a couple of months back. (I’d been intended to put them online for a while, but kept […]

Placenames of Kievan Rus’

By: | Post date: 2009-05-11 | Comments: 6 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Mediaeval Greek
Tags: ,

A culture confident in itself (or arrogant, same thing) will assimilate foreign place names and personal names, bending them to its language. Thus did Kshayarsha become Xerxes, and Shoshenq, Sesonchosis. Thus did Svyatoslav become Sphentísthlavos, and Dagobert Takoúpertos, and Saint-Gilles Isangéles. Thus did Hujr become Ógaros, and Ma’di Karib Badichárimos, and Kormisosh Kormésios. Thus, in […]

Malamirovo, Bulgaria, 813

By: | Post date: 2009-05-05 | Comments: 1 Comment
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Mediaeval Greek
Tags: ,

We have very, very, very little vernacular material from the Dark Ages, between Leontius of Neapolis in vii AD, and Michael Glycas’ Prison Verses from 1158. A couple of acclamations, the odd proverb, a song half-written down by Anna Comnena, a song reconstructed from a 16th century curse against mice, a few legal deeds from […]

Rumi and Sultan Walad, linguistic notes

By: | Post date: 2009-04-24 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Mediaeval Greek
Tags: , , , ,

The Greek of Rumi and Walad, like the Greek of the Proto-Bulgarian inscrptions, the Judaeo-Greek scripture translations, and the Latin-Greek phrasebooks, should be a more accurate reflection of the spoken language of the time than what we have in Greek script, inevitably influenced by diglossia. In fact, given where it was written, Rumi and Walad […]

Rumi and Sultan Walad, literary notes

By: | Post date: 2009-04-22 | Comments: 6 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Mediaeval Greek
Tags: , , ,

I’ll get into linguistic observations separately, but some literary notes here, including comments on the restoration of the text, and on its cultural particularities. The use of the Greek theological term σκήνωμα “hut, tabernacle” for the mortal body is noticeable, and establishes that Walad had been talking about Christianity with the local Greeks, and didn’t […]

Rumi and Sultan Walad, Konya, mid-1200s

By: | Post date: 2009-04-22 | Comments: 2 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Mediaeval Greek
Tags: , , ,

I’ve just put online the various transcriptions available of the Greek verses written by Mawlana Jalal ad-Din Rumi (1207-1273) (yeah, *that* Rumi), and Rumi’s son, Sultan Walad (1226-1312). I’m going to comment on the editions and the linguistics in the next couple of postings. Rumi and Walad wrote bits of Turkish and Greek among their […]

Dictionary coverage of Greek

By: | Post date: 2009-04-20 | Comments: 6 Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics, Mediaeval Greek
Tags: , , , ,

There’s three and a half millenia of Greek lexicon out there. Of course, that’s three and a half millennia if you accept that Mycenaean is the same language as is spoken on Greece’s Got Talent—which demands a bit of looseness in when you deem a language to have become a different language. (And the distinction […]

Μετά χαράς: supplemental

By: | Post date: 2009-04-18 | Comments: 4 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Mediaeval Greek
Tags: , ,

Philip points out that ípeto in the Dittamondo excerpt is also Greek: of course! And here, the commentary: “ípeto” Είπε το(ν) “He told him”. Obvious error for Είπα το(ν) “I told him”. I’m going to take the clitic on face value as accusative, confirming that whoever told degli Uberti about how a Macedonian peasant might […]

Μετά χαράς: archaisms in spoken Greek, 1350

By: | Post date: 2009-04-16 | Comments: 5 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Mediaeval Greek
Tags: , , ,

When I was researching the background to the Entertaining Tale of Quadrupeds in 1999, I came across Charles Gidel’s 1864 Imitations faites en grec depuis le douzième siècle, de nos anciens poèmes de chevalerie, which was the first mention of the Quadrupeds in scholarly literature. Early Modern Greek studies officially kicked off in 1870, with […]

  • Subscribe to Blog via Email

    Join 319 other subscribers

  • January 2022
    M T W T F S S
    « Nov    
     12
    3456789
    10111213141516
    17181920212223
    24252627282930
    31