Category: Literature

Against the recent PhD on Nathanael Bertos

By: | Post date: 2017-09-19 | Comments: 1 Comment
Posted in categories: Culture, Literature, Mediaeval Greek

My post on Nathanael Bertos was occasioned by a Google search that led me to find out that there had been a recent PhD thesis, which had just been published, by Despoina Athanasiadou-Stefanoudaki. I bought the book. Bertos was advertised as one of the earliest writers in Greek vernacular prose, and I knew nothing about him; […]

Nilus-Nathanael Bertos (?) (ca. 1460?): On a captive freed through the prayers of priests

By: | Post date: 2017-09-13 | Comments: 19 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Literature, Mediaeval Greek

I rejoin Hellenisteukontos with a translation of a sermon possibly by Nilus-Nathanael Bertos. No, most people have not heard of him, and justifiably so. He isn’t all that good. But the sermon struck me as so… WTF, so divorced from the world I know (a world substantially informed by the Reformation and the Enlightenment), that […]

The Mass of the Beardless Man

By: | Post date: 2017-08-06 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Literature, Mediaeval Greek

I’ve name-checked the Mass of the Beardless Man (Spanos) in Nick Nicholas’ answer to What is the dirtiest work of Modern Greek literature? I have been asked to provide a sample, and herewith I oblige. Spanos was written around 1500, in Northern Greece or Constantinople; I’ve noted the speculation by Tassos Karanastassis, that it was […]

What is the dirtiest work of Modern Greek literature?

By: | Post date: 2017-08-05 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Literature, Mediaeval Greek, Modern Greek

I know of three contenders; and having rebrowsed through one, I’m eliminating it from contention. I am, by the way, extending the definition back to 1000 AD. The contender I have not read (yet) is the only contender from the past century: The Great Eastern, by Greek surrealist Andreas Embirikos. It’s an encyclopaedia of all […]

Ooh! He Said ‘Fuck’! He must be a revolutionary!

By: | Post date: 2017-07-31 | Comments: 1 Comment
Posted in categories: Literature, Mediaeval Greek

I’ve been pondering taboos for quite a while now; you’ll see a recent rumination from me at Nice skewering of Humour as Virtue Signalling. In the West latterly, we exult in people breaking taboos, as if being a rebel and a taboo-breaker is its own reward. You know, Well, people tell me love is for […]

What are the most important new discoveries that have been made about the ancient world in the 21st Century?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-19 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Literature

In Greek philology, the biggest finds this century have been: The previously unreadable texts in the Archimedes Palimpsest, that have become readable through a synchrotron, including a couple of new texts by Archimedes, a new speech by Hyperides, and a new commentary on Aristotle by Alexander of Aphrodisias. Transcribed and released in 2008, though only […]

Which books on Greek and Roman mythology list the most number of mythological characters?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-15 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Literature

As I am nowadays saying openly, I worked at the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae for 17 years, 13 which I spent working on word recognition. As a result, I got to know pretty well where all the obscure names were in Greek literature. In the classical Canon, hands down, the Bibliotheca (Pseudo-Apollodorus). Among online resources, THEOI […]

What did Socrates mean when he said, “The unexamined life is not worth living”?

By: | Post date: 2017-06-17 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Literature

Not quite “not worth living”. The Greek is more absolute than that. I’ve been feeling guilty about Nick Nicholas’ answer to Since the active and middle voices of the 2nd aorist forms of “to stand” are intransitive (ἵστημι – ἔστην vs ἐστάμην), are these forms synonymous?, where I basically dismissed nuance in Ancient Greek as […]

Have the Eclogues and Florilegium of Stobaeus been translated into English?

By: | Post date: 2017-06-15 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Literature

To confirm what Alberto Yagos said: The best Princeton’s database of Byzantine translations has is Iamblichus’ Life of Pythagoras, or, Pythagoric life, which includes some sentences by Stobaeus. Here’s some bits translated online: The Gentle Exit ” Stobaeus Extracts Sentences and Precepts. By bits, I mean one paragraph. Here’s Roger Pearse, Patristic blogger, asking the […]

How did Plato address Socrates? Teacher? Master?

By: | Post date: 2017-06-13 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Literature

Originally Answered: How does Plato call Socrates? Of course, we don’t have transcripts by Plato of chats with Socrates, we have dialogues he made up. But Socrates is constantly addressed in Plato’s dialogues as “O Socrates” (ὦ Σώκρατες), with monotonous regularity—over 1200 times in the works of Plato. Socrates in turn addresses his trollees (er, […]

  • Subscribe to Blog via Email

    Join 283 other subscribers

  • September 2017
    M T W T F S S
    « Aug    
     123
    45678910
    11121314151617
    18192021222324
    252627282930