Category: Modern Greek

Greek -eza ethnonyms

By: | Post date: 2019-05-09 | Comments: 6 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek

I’m sure someone somewhere has already written about this. In fact, I’m sure multiple people have. But I enjoy reinventing the wheel. (And getting inspiration from Quora, as well as Nikos Sarantakos’ blog, for articles here. My thanks to Evangelos Lolos for prodding me on this.) Modern Greek used to have a lot of ethnonyms […]

o-vocatives: Analogical Account, IV: What Henrich said

By: | Post date: 2019-04-21 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek

I’ve finally taken the time to read Günther Henrich’s 1976 thesis on the spread of the -o vocative and -o genitive in Greek. My blog series has been something like 15 pp written off the cuff, with minimal research. Henrich’s is 270 pp of meticulous historical and dialectal research. He has orders of magnitude more […]

o-vocatives: Analogical account, Part III

By: | Post date: 2019-04-08 | Comments: 3 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek

In the last few posts, I’ve worked through the analogies that have extended the o-vocative into proper names: M1–M5, O2–O6. There was to-ing and fro-ing, there was nebulous definition and redefinition of rules, there was a whole ballet of criteria. But the ballet orchestration can be formulated: the rules for the analogy are sweeping, even […]

o-vocatives: Analogical account, Part II

By: | Post date: 2019-03-31 | Comments: 4 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek

So far we have accounted for: M1: Bisyllabic common nouns that used to be third declension: ˈɣeros “old man”, ˈðjakos “deacon”. (Ancient ɡérɔːn, diákɔːn). M2: Bisyllabic truncated, informal given names: ˈɣjorɣos, ˈnikos, ˈðimos (corresponding to the formal forms ɣeorɣios, nikolaos, ðimitrios) “George, Nick, Dimitri” M3: The trisyllabic (truncated) name aˈlekos “Alec” O2: Bisyllabic formal given […]

o-vocatives: Analogical account, Part I

By: | Post date: 2019-03-31 | Comments: 5 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek

So we have the messy data on the distribution of the o-vocative in Greek. And we have the tools to try and make sense of that distribution, in terms of features that classes of nouns with the o-vocative have in common. We also, as it turns out, have an entire PhD thesis on the o-vocative: […]

The retreat of the e-vocative in Modern Greek: the data

By: | Post date: 2019-03-27 | Comments: 3 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek

This is a story of analogy, based on an article at Nikos Sarantakos’ blog (because the traffic between our two blogs has ever been two-way). Sarantakos’ article in turn cites an older blog post by Giannis Haris, which cites two grammars of Modern Greek. The story is the retreat of the vocative in Modern Greek. […]

Your Firework Eyes: what the lyricist said

By: | Post date: 2019-03-22 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Modern Greek, Music

Michalis Bourboulis wrote the lyrics for Your Firework Eyes. Michalis Bourboulis has been interviewed about his greatest songs, including Your Firework Eyes. You can be a great artist, and still be a dick. For that matter, you can be a great artist, and still be clueless about what you’ve wrought. Bullying Stamos Semsis, the songwriter […]

Your Firework Eyes

By: | Post date: 2019-03-22 | Comments: 8 Comments
Posted in categories: Modern Greek, Music

Your Firework Eyes, Τα βεγγαλικά σου μάτια, is a 1995 song (Lyrics: Michalis Bourboulis, Music: Stamos Semsis), first sung by Giorgos Dalaras, and covered the following year by Dimitris Mitropanos. It is a moving, fragile, beautiful song about the loss of love. And there are some interesting things about how it was put together, that […]

Crossover artists in Greek pop: the Malamas–Karras effect

By: | Post date: 2019-03-20 | Comments: 2 Comments
Posted in categories: Modern Greek, Music

I am about to post here on late song renderings by Dimitris Mitropanos, and there’s something about what he did with his late repertoire that was special, but that I couldn’t quite put a name to. Mitropanos had a decades-long career as a Laiko artist: he worked in the mainstream Greek bouzouki pop tradition, singing […]

Updated posts on “What did your language sound like 1,000/500 years ago?”

By: | Post date: 2019-03-16 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Mediaeval Greek, Modern Greek

I have consolidated my old Quora posts http://hellenisteukontos.opoudjis.net/2016-10-01-what-did-your-language-sound-like-1-000-years-ago/ and http://hellenisteukontos.opoudjis.net/2016-10-05-what-did-your-language-sound-like-500-years-ago/, and just had it published in Greek on Nikos Sarantakos’ blog: https://sarantakos.wordpress.com/2019/03/15/nikolaou-3

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