Author: Nick Nicholas

Website:
http://www.opoudjis.net
About this author:
Data analyst, Greek linguist

Updated post on “Which formerly Ottoman-occupied peoples understand “s–tir” today?”

By: | Post date: 2019-08-10 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek, Other Languages

I have had an updated version of my old Quora post Which formerly Ottoman-occupied peoples understand “s–tir” today? published in Greek on Nikos Sarantakos’ blog, as Η υστεροφημία του σιχτίρ, “The legacy of sixtir”.

Updated post on “Does the Greek word for watermelon, karpouzi, come from Ancient Greek?”

By: | Post date: 2019-07-31 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek, Other Languages

I have had an updated version of my old Quora post Does the Greek word for watermelon, karpouzi, come from Ancient Greek? published in Greek on Nikos Sarantakos’ blog, as Από πού βγαίνει το καρπούζι;, “Where does karpouzi come from?”.

Updated post on “Why do English-speaking people not prefer to say natrium, silisium, kalium, and use other Latin names of elements instead?”

By: | Post date: 2019-06-22 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek

I have had an updated version of my old Quora posts Why do English-speaking people not prefer to say natrium, silisium, kalium, and use other Latin names of elements instead? and Where do the distinctive Greek names for chemical elements come from? published in Greek on Nikos Sarantakos’ blog, as Τα ελληνόψυχα χημικά στοιχεία, “Greek-souled […]

Updated post on “How are Rumi’s poems in Greek?”

By: | Post date: 2019-06-08 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Literature, Mediaeval Greek

I have had an updated version of my old Quora post How are Rumi’s poems in Greek? published in Greek on Nikos Sarantakos’ blog, as Τα ελληνικά ποιήματα του Τζελαλεντίν Ρουμί, “The Greek poems of Jalal ad-Din Rumi”.

Updated post on “What are some interesting examples of Ancient Greek vernacular?”

By: | Post date: 2019-05-27 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Writing Systems

I have had an updated version of my old Quora post What are some interesting examples of Ancient Greek vernacular? published in Greek on Nikos Sarantakos’ blog, as Ο Κρίμωνας και το παιδί του Βαθυκλή, “Crimon and Bathycles’ son”.

Fifty shades of paraphilia, followup

By: | Post date: 2019-05-14 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

My original post on the clumsy coinages of terms for paraphilias was a bit of careless venting on Quora, and did not bother researching the creation of the words too deeply. It was, as commenters at Nikos Sarantakos’ blog correctly identified, some xavales, “goofing off”. (Sarantakos did say when I sent him the post, “I […]

Updated post on “What is it called when you get aroused by watching people die?”

By: | Post date: 2019-05-13 | Comments: 1 Comment
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, English, Linguistics

I have had an updated version of my old Quora post What is it called when you get aroused by watching people die? published in Greek on Nikos Sarantakos’ blog, as Οι πενήντα αποχρώσεις της παραφιλίας, “Fifty shades of paraphilia”.

Greek -eza ethnonyms

By: | Post date: 2019-05-09 | Comments: 6 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek

I’m sure someone somewhere has already written about this. In fact, I’m sure multiple people have. But I enjoy reinventing the wheel. (And getting inspiration from Quora, as well as Nikos Sarantakos’ blog, for articles here. My thanks to Evangelos Lolos for prodding me on this.) Modern Greek used to have a lot of ethnonyms […]

Updated post on “If you were allowed to add a symbol to unicode, what symbol would it be, and what would it mean?”

By: | Post date: 2019-04-22 | Comments: 1 Comment
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Writing Systems

I have had an updated version of my old Quora post If you were allowed to add a symbol to unicode, what symbol would it be, and what would it mean? published in Greek on Nikos Sarantakos’ blog, as Πώς χαντάκωσα τα Παμφυλιακά, “How I ruined Pamphylian”—referring to how I’m responsible for the psi-like Pamphylian […]

o-vocatives: Analogical Account, IV: What Henrich said

By: | Post date: 2019-04-21 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek

I’ve finally taken the time to read Günther Henrich’s 1976 thesis on the spread of the -o vocative and -o genitive in Greek. My blog series has been something like 15 pp written off the cuff, with minimal research. Henrich’s is 270 pp of meticulous historical and dialectal research. He has orders of magnitude more […]

  • Subscribe to Blog via Email

    Join 313 other subscribers

  • November 2019
    M T W T F S S
    « Aug    
     123
    45678910
    11121314151617
    18192021222324
    252627282930