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Day: July 25, 2017

What’s the slang word for “blowjob” in your language or country?

By: | Post date: 2017-07-25 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek

In Greek, pipa “smoking pipe” (cf. Blandine Meyrieux-Lefevre’s answer for French), or tsimbouki “hookah pipe” < Turkish çubuk. That was a Google Image search for “hookah pipe”. Let’s just say that doing a Google Image search in a public place for τσιμπούκι was a mistake… As τσιμπούκι – SLANG.gr informs me (Hi, Melinda!), the Turkish […]

What is “does the bear shit in the woods” an example of in language?

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Posted in categories: English, Linguistics

Aside from being a rhetorical question, it is also a Conventional Implicature: the primary meaning of the phrase is “this is obvious”, even though this is not the literal meaning of the phrase, and that meaning replies from Gricean maxims of conversation. (“What does ursine defecation have to do with my question as a counterquestion? […]

What is a better way of representing the /ʔ/ and /ʕ/ sounds than apostrophes or other punctuation marks?

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Posted in categories: Other Languages, Writing Systems

I’m going to take a long time to say “none”. Glottal stop – Wikipedia The most common convention in Latin script is indeed to use apostrophe; and the disadvantage of the apostrophe is that it’s easy to miss, easy to conflate with a quotation mark, and it doesn’t look like a “real” letter. The same […]

Is it possible to use the ancient Gothic alphabet to write in English?

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Posted in categories: Other Languages, Writing Systems

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_alphabet One might argue that the phonological inventory of Gothic is a spectacularly bad match for that of Modern English. But then again, so was the phonological inventory of Latin. I think you can, so long as you hold your nose and write vowels as a one to one match with Modern English; you’re not […]

Can “αἰὲν ἀνάβηθι” be improved to resemble the Latin “excelsior?”

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Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Linguistics

Not that I actually know much about Homeric Greek, but the infinitive does work better than the imperative, because it makes it less personal and more gnomic: it is a statement to the world, not a command to the individual. Although in context, it is not a command anyway, but reported speech: Ever to Excel […]