Archive:

Day: March 31, 2019

o-vocatives: Analogical account, Part II

By: | Post date: 2019-03-31 | Comments: 4 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek

So far we have accounted for: M1: Bisyllabic common nouns that used to be third declension: ˈɣeros “old man”, ˈðjakos “deacon”. (Ancient ɡérɔːn, diákɔːn). M2: Bisyllabic truncated, informal given names: ˈɣjorɣos, ˈnikos, ˈðimos (corresponding to the formal forms ɣeorɣios, nikolaos, ðimitrios) “George, Nick, Dimitri” M3: The trisyllabic (truncated) name aˈlekos “Alec” O2: Bisyllabic formal given […]

o-vocatives: Analogical account, Part I

By: | Post date: 2019-03-31 | Comments: 5 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics, Modern Greek

So we have the messy data on the distribution of the o-vocative in Greek. And we have the tools to try and make sense of that distribution, in terms of features that classes of nouns with the o-vocative have in common. We also, as it turns out, have an entire PhD thesis on the o-vocative: […]

How analogy works, and what analogy does

By: | Post date: 2019-03-31 | Comments: 2 Comments
Posted in categories: Linguistics

We have seen the data on the spread of o-vocatives in Modern Greek. I will post how I make sense of the data. But first, some preliminaries about analogy. How analogy works Analogy in language change takes a linguistic rule that applies to one word or paradigm or category, and starts applying it to another […]

  • Subscribe to Blog via Email

    Join 311 other subscribers

  • March 2019
    M T W T F S S
    « Feb   Apr »
     123
    45678910
    11121314151617
    18192021222324
    25262728293031