Category: Latin

Can anybody help with the Latin translation of “Showing up is the biggest step.”?

By: | Post date: 2017-01-29 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

Apparere gradus maximus [est]. As always with these questions: no tattoo until you get a second opinion. Answered 2017-01-29 [Originally posted on http://quora.com/Can-anybody-help-with-the-Latin-translation-of-Showing-up-is-the-biggest-step/answer/Nick-Nicholas-5]

How do I translate these sentences into Latin?

By: | Post date: 2017-01-22 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

This is parasitic on Alberto Yagos’s answer. Would be nice if we could call these collaborative answers! Don’t let your dreams be memes. Alberto is more than right to call memes graffiti. So: Ne tibi fiant spes inscriptionum res. Let not your hopes be the subject matter of graffiti. Not… great, not at all. If […]

During antiquity, did anyone in Greece or Rome recognize similarities between Greek and Latin languages and hypothesized relationships between them?

By: | Post date: 2017-01-20 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, Latin, Linguistics

Yup. Aeolism: Latin as a Dialect of Greek/Aeolism: Latin as a Dialect of Greek is a paper on that. And Are there any accounts of the Romans realizing linguistic similarity between Latin and Germanic languages? • /r/AskHistorians is a Reddit thread of it. The locus classicus is Dionysius of Halicarnassus, but the idea was doing […]

Is there a word for “time travel” using Greek or Latin parts of speech?

By: | Post date: 2017-01-16 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Ancient Greek, English, Latin, Linguistics

The Modern Greek for “time travel” is the unimaginative calque Ταξίδι στο χρόνο (“travel in time”). It does indeed use the chronos word; but taxidi is a mediaeval word which now means “travel, journey” (originally, it was “expedition”). Star Trek was originally rendered in Greek as Ταξίδι στα Άστρα “Journey to the Stars”. For a […]

If the word “homo religiosus” used by scholars mean a ‘religious human,’ what would be an equivalent Latin term for a “meaning seeking human”?

By: | Post date: 2016-12-28 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

Homo significans, “human who makes meaning”, is already a well established expression. So is homo interpres, “interpreting human”, human who makes sense of things. You’re doing something more subtle: “seeking meaning in the universe, anticipating that there will be meaning”. It’s very close to homo interpres. But if you want to be more explicit: homo […]

How did the verb esse end up suffixed to the back of the perfect stem in the latin’s perfect conjugations?

By: | Post date: 2016-12-25 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

Vote #1 Christopher Kowalewski: That’s the working through of internal reconstruction that you only see the results of in the textbooks. Now, Chad Turner suggests I’d know the answer. God, *I* don’t know the answer. But Sihler does: New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin. Or at least, Sihler knows as much of the answer […]

How do you translate “blockchain” and “bitcoin” to Latin?

By: | Post date: 2016-12-22 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

This won’t be good, for the reasons Alberto Yagos said. The Greek for bit is: Bit – Βικιπαίδεια. Of course. There is a Hellenic coinage recommended by the Greek Standards Organisation: δυφίο dyphio[n], from dyo “two” and psēphion “digit”. The Ancient Greeks didn’t do portmanteaux, which is what this is; but if you want a […]

What is the Latin translation for “I am broken, the only one who can fix me is the one who broke me”?

By: | Post date: 2016-12-14 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

Fractus sum: solus qui me fregit me reparabit. (or, less elegantly: me reparare potest: “can fix me”, as opposed to “will fix me”.) Answered 2016-12-14 [Originally posted on http://quora.com/What-is-the-Latin-translation-for-I-am-broken-the-only-one-who-can-fix-me-is-the-one-who-broke-me/answer/Nick-Nicholas-5]

What is the best way to say “innovative agile support” in Latin?

By: | Post date: 2016-12-11 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

Remixing the others’: Ut succurramus innovantes agiliter: To support by agilely innovating. Answered 2016-12-11 [Originally posted on http://quora.com/What-is-the-best-way-to-say-innovative-agile-support-in-Latin/answer/Nick-Nicholas-5]

What is a concise Latin translation of “Just because someone does bad things doesn’t mean bad things should happen to them”?

By: | Post date: 2016-11-15 | Comments: No Comments
Posted in categories: Latin, Linguistics

Etsi quis mala facit, mala ei ne fiant. Before you get a tat with it, stay tuned for Alberto Yagos to say Yea or Nay. Updated 2016-11-15 [Originally posted on http://quora.com/What-is-a-concise-Latin-translation-of-“Just-because-someone-does-bad-things-doesn’t-mean-bad-things-should-happen-to-them”/answer/Nick-Nicholas-5]

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